History of Navel Dress 1930 (CCS reprint 2001)
Players Reprinted Series History of Navel Dress 1930 (CCS reprint 2001) History of Navel Dress 1930 (CCS reprint 2001) 50 - This colourful set, as the title suggests, features sailors apparel from a 10th century Saxon Buscarle right up to a Chief Engineer of 1879. Included is a seaman’s arctic kit from 1602 recorded as being worn while searching for the North West Passage, the wide canvas breeches of the seaman of 1690, the full skirted coat of an Admiral of 1748, the costume of a gunner of 1750 taken from an inventory of effects, a ship’s caulker of 1790 who unusually wears trousers and a ship’s cook with a wooden leg. The informative text on the reverse tells us that the navy were encouraged to recruit cooks from those who had been maimed. The card for the Seaman of 1805 shows him wearing striped blue trousers and sporting a pigtail which we are told was popular between 1785 and 1823. By 1854 during the war in the Crimea we are told seamen of the Naval Brigade usually wore a Scottish style cap such as a Glengarry or Kilmarnock. A colourful set backed by interesting information. Size 68 x 36mm.
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History of Navel Dress 1930 (CCS reprint 2001)

Issuer: Players Condition: Mint Description: This colourful set, as the title suggests, features sailors apparel from a 10th century Saxon Buscarle right up to a Chief Engineer of 1879. Included is a seaman’s arctic kit from 1602 recorded as being worn while searching for the North West Passage, the wide canvas breeches of the seaman of 1690, the full skirted coat of an Admiral of 1748, the costume of a gunner of 1750 taken from an inventory of effects, a ship’s caulker of 1790 who unusually wears trousers and a ship’s cook with a wooden leg. The informative text on the reverse tells us that the navy were encouraged to recruit cooks from those who had been maimed. The card for the Seaman of 1805 shows him wearing striped blue trousers and sporting a pigtail which we are told was popular between 1785 and 1823. By 1854 during the war in the Crimea we are told seamen of the Naval Brigade usually wore a Scottish style cap such as a Glengarry or Kilmarnock. A colourful set backed by interesting information. Size 68 x 36mm. Number of cards in set: 50

Price for complete set: Only £12.50

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